Forum

LEVIN COLLEGE FORUM

Equity Planning Symposium

Maxine Goodman Levin College of Urban Affairs
1717 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio 44115 
November 12, 2015
Cleveland State University
(Bonda Board Room 254)

Watch a video of this forum event:
Panel 1 Morning Session | Panel 2 & 3 Afternoon Session

8:30 - 9:00am Welcome and Introductions
Robert Gleeson, Interim Dean and Levin Chair, Levin College of Urban Affairs, 
Cleveland State University 
Robert E. Eckardt, Executive Vice President, The Cleveland Foundation

9:00am - 12:30pm Author presentation panels—Susan Christopherson, Chair, City and 
Regional Planning Program, Cornell University, Moderator

Panel 1: Lessons from Cases
Lisa K. Bates, Planning for Growth without Displacement
Michelle M. Thompson and Brittany Arceneaux, The New PPGIS: Using Citizen 
Science to Promote Equitable Community Engagement
Todd Swanstrom, Transit-Oriented Development in a Disadvantaged Suburb: The Crucial Role of Civic Engagement 
Patrick M. Costigan, Improving Future options for Public Housing Residents

10:15 - 10:25am Break

Panel 2: Public Policy Innovations
Chris Benner, Metropolitan Equity and Economic Growth
Robert Giloth, Economic and Workforce Development
Joe Grengs, Access and Social Justice in Transportation Planning
Mark McDermott, High Performing Community Development
Deborah Howe, Equity for Aging

Panel 3: The Future
Ken Reardon, Participatory Action Research and Preparation for the Next Generation of Planners
Norman Krumholz, Reflections on the Future of Equity Planning 

12:30 - 1:30pm Lunch

1:30 - 2:30pm Feedback for Authors

2:30 - 2:45pm Break

2:30 - 4:30pm Discussion of Themes

5:30 - 7:30pm Reception 
Aloft Hotel, Flats East Bank, 1111 West 10th Street · Cleveland, Ohio, 44113 

The book and symposium are made possible by a grant from the Cleveland Foundation and the CSU Walter Waetjen Annual Lecture Fund. We are very grateful for their support and interest in this endeavor.

Equity Planning

Urban planning has always been concerned with the multi-faceted systems of cities—housing, transportation, economic development, land use, environment and neighborhoods –all of which promise, but do not necessarily deliver benefits for the poor. Similarly, the concept of a more just society is not new to planning but in recent years it has been driven to the margins of the profession. But professions change: not only in their ideas, tools, and the issues they address, but also in the problems that divide them. Rising inequality and other well-publicized socio-economic changes now challenge the belief that a rising tide alone will lift all boats and make a powerful argument for a new emphasis on equity and justice.

Equity Planning Book Description

Urban planning has always been concerned with the multi-faceted systems of cities—housing, transportation, economic development, land use, environment and neighborhoods –all of which promise, but do not necessarily deliver benefits for the poor. Similarly, the concept of a more just society is not new to planning but in recent years it has been driven to the margins of the profession. But professions change: not only in their ideas, tools, and the issues they address, but also in the problems that divide them. Rising inequality and other well-publicized socio-economic changes now challenge the belief that a rising tide alone will lift all boats and make a powerful argument feor a new emphasis on equity and justice. In this edited book, we will examine recent shifts in urban planning practice and offer proposals to strengthen the profession’s potential to be an instrument of redistributive justice, based on the latest research and case studies.

The authors are a mix of senior and younger scholars, theorists and practitioners representing the multiple facets of the planning profession. Using real-world examples, they seek to influence today’s practicing planners and the educators who are preparing the planners of the future. Through their writing, the book will make the case that urban planners have a professional responsibility to be a more powerful voice for equity in decision-making.

Planners are uniquely positioned to gather and synthesize relevant information from often-competing actors and perspectives to frame conclusions and recommendations for decision makers. They must ask the hard questions: Who must be at the table and be heard? Whose interests must be considered? What criteria must be used to judge proposals? What purposes are to be fulfilled? Will current, more mainstream approaches result in a more equitable situation? The authors will consider both intended and unintended outcomes, with the focus on impacts on people in general and disadvantaged groups in particular.

This book will demonstrate how, at a time of impoverished governments, faltering economies, and federal neglect planners have been freer to build alliances with collaborating organizations and propose their own equitable solutions, because everyone is looking for workable proposals that can make the most of resources they can tap.

The Cleveland Foundation initiated the concept and provided the funding for this book to recognize the importance of equity planning and Cleveland’s role in its resurgence nationwide.The book is a collaboration between Cleveland State and Cornell. Krumholz, an alumna of Cornell’s planning school, is widely regarded as a planning “legend” for promoting the practice of equity planning. In the late 80’s, he and Cornell professor John Forrester published a nationally significant book, “Making Equity Planning Work." Harvard University Professor Alan Altshuler said of this book when it was published that "No planner, I predict, will be able to consider his education complete during the next decade or so who has not grappled vicariously with the dilemmas Krumholz faced."

Author Bios

Susan Christopherson, Ph.D., Professor and Department Chair, City & Regional Planning, College of Architecture, Arts and Planning, Cornell University

Susan Christopherson is a geographer committed to the integration of scholarly work and public engagement. She has published a series of key articles and a prize-winning book examining how market governance regimes influence regional economic development and firm strategies. She is also a recognized expert in the field of media studies with a record of research and publication on the media entertainment industries. She has more than 100 publications on topics illuminating the spatial dimensions of economy and society, and has served on numerous editorial boards. She is currently editor-in-chief of the Regional Studies Association/Taylor Francis Book Series on Cities and Regions.

Christopherson's public engagement spans the local and the global. She has consulted with the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development and the United Nations, and directed projects on economic development in the U.S. Great Lakes region. Her recent work focuses on human-environment relations, related to unconventional energy extraction. Christopherson received a Ph.D. from the University of California–Berkeley.

Lisa K. Bates, PhD, Associate Professor, Toulan School of Urban Studies and Planning, Portland State University

Dr. Bates’ research focuses on housing and community development policy and planning, and is especially concerned with policy design and implementation that dismantles institutional racism. She has engaged in research, planning, and policy formulation with a variety of government and nonprofit partners, including ACORN Housing Corporation, the City of Portland Bureau of Planning and Sustainability, the Portland Housing Center, and PolicyLink.